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ICE


When I got to Cambodia I saw people having ice in many places, in cafeterias, in bars… there were always people having iced drinks, there was ice everywhere. I saw it and I didn’t trust it because, in general, in the underdeveloped countries the ice is a complicated issue, you can get very sick because of it. I saw my friend Berta eating the ice from the coffee every morning and she told me “don’t worry, trust, the ice in Cambodia is ok”. As she did it every day, I got confident and I started to have ice without worrying. Then I noticed the people didn’t have fridges and, instead of them, they have some orange plastic boxes, where they keep their drinks and food cool using ice blocks. Since then, I thought that there should be a lot of ice factories and that I would like to visit one, and so I did one day when I saw one while riding the bicycle.

It was the sunrise, the sun was coming up and the ice bars were beautiful with the reflections. I could see lots of ice bars ones over the others and a lot of movement in the factory. The trucks were already there ready to be loaded to start the delivery. Like a bakery , the very early morning is the busiest moment. They moved the ice bars using some kind of metal hooks that they stack in it. I was looking how they load the trucks and a man invited me to try to move one…. Impossible, too heavy! the man told me that each bar was 52 kg! To store it in the truck, in order to avoid one bar from slippering over the others, they put some rubber recycled from old engines.
Last, to deliver it to the shops, they needed to cut it in smaller pieces, so they could put them into the cooler boxes and in the machines that crush ice to fill all our drinks.
TW_ARTWATERENESS_KAMPONG_CHAM_HIELO (9)

Date: April 30 Skills: ISL - LSE, ON WHEELS, the route

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